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This is a community for anyone who loves the game of chess and learning its elements, along with inspirational quotes and advice for improving at it, feel free to participate!

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Sept. 10, 2019, 6:46 a.m.

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KaosAquarius
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KaosAquarius 9 hours ago

"To know ten thousand things, know one well" - Musashi Miyamoto
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KaosAquarius 6 days, 9 hours ago

"When my opponent's clock is going I discuss general considerations in an internal dialogue with myself. When my own clock is going I analyse concrete variations." - Mikhail Botvinnik
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KaosAquarius 3 days, 9 hours ago

"The player with advantage must attack" - Wilhem Steinitz was famous for making rules. Some became the foundation of how the game is played. Others couldn't even be followed successfully by Steinitz himself. One of his most famous rules -which is known as Steinitz's Law- is based on the premise that sound attacks stem from positional advantages. Your attack cannot succeed if you don't have an edge to justify it, he said. This was brilliant and original. It replaced the older view that attacks succeeded or failed because of the attacker's genius or lack of it. Steinitz could have stopped there. But he added a guide to action: The player who obtains that edge not only has the right but the obligation to attack. If he doesn't, his advantage is bound to evaporate. [Source: A. Soltis, The Wisest Things Ever Said About Chess]
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Yes, Steinitz love making rules. Now some GMs like making rules too. But I don't think "The player with advantage must attack" it right. You can make your advantage larger in two ways: 1. Attacking 2.Position play style, where you make your pieses' place better and better every move! - Chess player on Sept. 15, 2019, 10 a.m.


Your idea is understandable, but I think also that it is not just simply a generic rule in pursuit of an invisible initiative, but a natural law of the game, that's why it strictly says that only the player with the advantage can attack, which implies that attack can only be possible with a positional justification to unfold the active potential of a player's coordinated pieces, it doesn't mean 'to get advantage you must attack', however I agree that improving the pieces activity is a valid approach to acquire an advantage, but what is to be done when a player's pieces are already better than his opponent's pieces? keep improving them? It would be uninspiring, if not mediocre to say the least, to expect mistakes from the opponent to get an advantage while just optimizing pieces, so the quest for initiative with better pieces must be carried out through the principle of attack, as Lasker once stated 'position play complements combination [attacking] play', which is a preface to Steinitz's idea, but in general I think your criterion is alright in reference to positional style. Regards. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 15, 2019, 11:35 a.m.


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KaosAquarius 6 days, 5 hours ago

White to play! Checkmate in 3 moves, from the game Addicks - Gudjev, Prague 1931
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Bxf7, Kxf7, Ng5+,Kg8 or Kf6 ,Qd6# Checkmate! - pawnbeat on Sept. 10, 2019, 12:39 p.m.


gg! Look forward to more tactical exercises - KaosAquarius on Sept. 10, 2019, 10:49 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 9 hours ago

Exact calculation is, generally speaking, needed more in defensive positions than in attack. This counter-intuitive truth comes from Rudolf Spielmann in The Art of Sacrifice in Chess. A modern version, from Vladimir Kramnik on e3e5.com, is that calculation is "far more important in defense than in attack." He added: "In order to succeed in defense one must be a brilliant tactician and see all the possibilities and all the tactical points of the opponent. I'd even suggest such a 'seditious' idea that the attack is a more positional technique than the defense. The attack can be based on general considerations while the defense must be specific." (A. Soltis - The Wisest Things Ever Said About Chess)
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KaosAquarius 5 days, 17 hours ago

"If the student forces himself to examine all moves that smite, however absurd they may look at first glance, he is on the way to becoming a master of tactics." - Cecil Purdy
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KaosAquarius 2 days, 18 hours ago

White to play and deliver checkmate! From the game Alekhine - Freeman, New York 1924
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Solution: In this position the tactical themes of the pin and the deviation outstand for their dynamic force on the opponent's camp, since the black knight is pinned by the e8-rook thus restricting its mobility, the coordination of white pieces, knight and queen are threatening checkmate on g7 so the knight can't get to g6 to block the threat due to the pin, and the black queen must keep guarding g7, however white's queen is just undefended as it stands on g5, urging white to play actively as the position demands so as to not lose the advantage, therefore what Alekhine played here is 1.Nh6+!! pressing black to either capture the knight [Not with the pawn of course, because of the pin once again, but with the queen instead], or move his king to the only available square h8, which he doesn't because then the f8-knight would be left unprotected and white would simply capture it with checkmate, so the true idea of this maneuver unfolds after black captures the knight with ...Qxh6; and now it is noticeable how the black queen that was defending the h4-d8 diagonal has been deviated from its labor allowing white to conclude the game flawlessly with 2.Rxf8+ sacrificing his rook and also attracting the king to his finale after ...Kxf7 only move, as the rook controlled the entire 8th rank and 3.Qd8# dispensing with all available material force to achieve a stunning climax in great tactical style, gg!!! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 14, 2019, 11:23 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 2 days, 18 hours ago

Black to play and execute the ancient arabian mate, the oldest checkmate, in 4 moves! More info about this pattern here: https://www.chesskid.com/article/view/the-oldest-checkmate-ever-the-arabian-mate
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The solution is: 1....Rf2+ clearing f3 for the knight and pressing the white king to retreat, of course white doesn't block with Rg2 because that would just lose the rook and the game sooner than soon; 2.Kh1 now the king is totally restricted, but to give the checkmate the knight must be brought into the action! so black plays the brilliant ...Rh2+!!, sacrificing the rook and leaving white with no other choice than 3.Kxh2 so black can now play ...Nf3+! as it is check with a knight, it can't be blocked, so either the knight must be captured or the king has to move, in this case the only move available is 4.Kh1 as the rook on g8 blocks any the escape squares of the white king through g3 or g2, and now as both pieces, the f3-knight and g8-rook are focusing their force at g1 the grand finale of the combination is ...Rxg1#, delivering this fantastic arabian checkmate, gg! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 14, 2019, 10:43 p.m.


I never heard of this mate. Where doe sit come from? - pawnbeat on Sept. 15, 2019, 8:22 p.m.


This checkmate sequence comes from the spiritual ancestor of chess in its early setup known as shatranj, and its most powerful pieces were the knight and the rook, so the most usual way to give checkmate was through the maneuvering of these pieces, here's some more info about it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shatranj https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Checkmate_pattern#Arabian_mate - KaosAquarius on Sept. 16, 2019, 12:26 a.m.


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KaosAquarius 4 days, 12 hours ago

White to play and win! From this position of the game Akobian - Lugo, Minneapolis 2005
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Beautiful combination. Rf7+, Qxf7, Rh4, Kg8, Rh8# Checkmate. - pawnbeat on Sept. 12, 2019, 12:16 p.m.


Indeed, Rf7+ is a really nice maneuver to deviate the queen from the protection of the h4-square while blocking the only escape square for the black king, gg! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 12, 2019, 7:40 p.m.


I enjoy this puzzles. Maybe we can add puzzles to our communities? Like a feature for chess related communities? - pawnbeat on Sept. 13, 2019, 2:42 a.m.


Good idea, looking forward to it! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 13, 2019, 6:44 a.m.


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pawnbeat 5 days, 2 hours ago

Analyse the position. Black to move. Choose best move: 1. Qc7 2. Qd6 3. Bg7 4. NxR
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Interesting and difficult position. This happened at the World Cup 2019! - pawnbeat on Sept. 11, 2019, 10:24 p.m.


Very difficult position, by elimination the 3rd and 4th options are discarded, ...Nxe1 leads to checkmate by white after giving up the rook on b5 and then the queen on d7; ...Bg7 doesn't lead to checkmate but allows the white pieces to activate first with a check from the queen on a4, then Re3 attacking the knight and so on; then the only considerable options would be ...Qc7 or ...Qd6, both which threaten an immediate checkmate on h2 while clearing the d8 square for the king after white checks him from a4, although ...Qc7 looks a bit odd to me because the queen is undefended on that square while on d6 it is defended by the e7-pawn, but ...Qd6 lets the white pieces activate after the exchange of queens with Qxd6 exd6, Re3 attacking the knight and the black pieces start retreating, so I would choose ...Qc7 which although looks a bit odd, holds the checkmate threat and clears a square for the king on e8, but still the position looks very double edged and with inaccurate play by any of the players it could lead to a win for any of them, so ...Qc7 seems the most balanced move - KaosAquarius on Sept. 11, 2019, 10:38 p.m.


From what game of the world cup is it? I'd like to check it out - KaosAquarius on Sept. 11, 2019, 10:41 p.m.


I just saw it's from the Svidler - Albornoz game, and actually ...Qc7 wins for white! :0 Well, the black position was already very passive and really difficult to defend, and didn't even consider ...Bg7 since I played against the engine and was outplayed pretty quickly haha but ...Bg7 is better in fact, difficult exercise though, but I think black didn't play good enough until this position. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 13, 2019, 12:53 a.m.


How did you find this game? - pawnbeat on Sept. 13, 2019, 9:56 p.m.


Watching agadmator's YouTube channel, he recently posted an analysis of it. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 13, 2019, 10:04 p.m.


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pawnbeat 9 hours ago

Have you ever read the book the 49 of Power by Robert Green? I recommend it if you haven't.

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No, I'll check it out, surely some philosophy never comes bad, thanks for the recommendation. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 16, 2019, 8:26 a.m.


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