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This is a community for anyone who loves the game of chess and learning its elements, along with inspirational quotes and advice for improving at it, feel free to participate!

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Sept. 10, 2019, 6:46 a.m.

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KaosAquarius
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KaosAquarius 1 day, 11 hours ago

White to play and win! [Position from the game Nunn - T.C. Fox, Bristol 1980]
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1.Qxf8 Kxf8 2.Bh6 Bg7 3.Re8 - Chess player on Dec. 12, 2019, 8:21 p.m.


Correct, a nice back-rank checkmate - KaosAquarius on Dec. 12, 2019, 9:01 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 1 day, 12 hours ago

“Openings teach you openings. Endgames teach you chess!” – Stephan Gerzadowicz
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KaosAquarius 3 days, 13 hours ago

“By all means examine the games of the great chess players, but don’t swallow them whole. Their games are valuable not for their separate moves, but for their vision of chess, their way of thinking.” – Anatoly Karpov
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KaosAquarius 4 days, 15 hours ago

“He who has a slight disadvantage plays more attentively, inventively and more boldly than his antagonist who either takes it easy or aspires after too much. Thus a slight disadvantage is very frequently seen to convert into a good, solid advantage.” – Emanuel Lasker
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KaosAquarius 4 days, 15 hours ago

In this position from the game Jugelt - Brandt [Bad Zwischenahn 2006] white has the move and wins!
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As black is weak on the g-file, precisely on the g8-square, white maneuvers the knight and rook in order to give a pretty arabian checkmate with 1.Nf6+! Kh8 [only move] and 2.Rg8# - KaosAquarius on Dec. 10, 2019, 6:25 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 1 week, 1 day ago

"Independence of thought is a (most) valuable quality in a chess-player, both at the board and when preparing for a game." – David Bronstein
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KaosAquarius 1 week, 1 day ago

Thanks for the donation and joining the community, CHESSLOVER. Enjoy your stay in Cardigan Chess!

CHESSLOVER became a villager and now supports Cardigan Chess: Quotes & Life's Community

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KaosAquarius 1 week, 2 days ago

"Do not mind losing, for it is only by learning that you will improve, and by losing, if you use the knowledge you gained, you will improve rapidly. If you play with a much better player, so much more likely that you will learn. Any ordinary man can learn a great deal of chess just as of music, art or science, if he cares to devote his time and attention to study of the game." – José Capablanca
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Chess player 1 week, 2 days ago

Hello Julio!

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Enjoy your stay in the community Julio! Thanks for joining - KaosAquarius on Dec. 4, 2019, 3:57 p.m.


Julio became a villager and now supports Cardigan Chess: Quotes & Life's Community

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KaosAquarius 1 week, 3 days ago

Dear community users, a Televistar Discord chat server has just been created here: https://discord.gg/paYEDsd feel free to join and be part of the talk! Request a song to Hydra the musical bot, post your ideas or support the platform with your appreciated feedback and have a great day :)
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KaosAquarius 1 week, 4 days ago

"Inspiration usually comes during work rather than before it." – Madeleine L’Engle
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KaosAquarius 3 weeks, 2 days ago

"A chess game is a dialogue, a conversation between a player and his opponent. Each move by the opponent may contain threats or be a blunder, but a player cannot defend against threats or take advantage of blunders if he does not first ask himself: What is my opponent planning after each move?" – Bruce A. Moon
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KaosAquarius 3 weeks, 6 days ago

"You need to motivate yourself, no matter what, definitely when things are bad, but also when things are good. Or else, you risk becoming complacent." – Viswanathan Anand
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KaosAquarius 1 month, 1 week ago

"As proved by evidence, chess is more lasting in its being and presence than all books and achievements; the only game that belongs to all people and all ages; of which none knows the divinity that bestowed it on the world, to slay boredom, to sharpen the senses, to exhilarate the spirit." – Stefan Zweig
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KaosAquarius 1 month, 1 week ago

"Some things are really hard to do, almost impossible to do, like playing perfectly in extremely complicated positions. But it really bugs me when I miss things that I really shouldn't have. I am always going to make mistakes. I don't have any illusions that my understanding of chess is perfect or anything like that. It's just that I have to work on relatively simple mistakes. When I can lower the percentage of such mistakes then things are going to be much better." – Magnus Carlsen
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I really believe Carlsen is the best of the modern times. But he is kinda going through a bad time now. - pawnbeat on Nov. 5, 2019, 1:58 p.m.


Don't worry, Carlsen truly has proven more than enough of his worth to the chess community and no one can take that from him, a champion is a champion and even in difficult times there are lessons that help us improve and Carlsen is no exception, Wesley So recently won the 960 championship against him, but Carlsen still is a living legend and will surpass this tough period, cheers! - KaosAquarius on Nov. 5, 2019, 11:36 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 1 month, 2 weeks ago

"You sit at the board and suddenly your heart leaps. Your hand trembles to pick up the piece and move it. But what Chess teaches you is that you must sit there calmly and think about whether it's really a good idea and whether there are other better ideas." – Stanley Kubrick
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KaosAquarius 1 month, 3 weeks ago

"Freedom is nothing else but a chance to be better." – Albert Camus
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KaosAquarius 1 month, 3 weeks ago

"Your ego can become an obstacle to your work. If you start believing in your greatness, it is the death of your creativity." – Marina Abramovic
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KaosAquarius 1 month, 3 weeks ago

"I have always a slight feeling of pity for the man who has no knowledge of chess, just as I would pity the man who has remained ignorant of love. Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make man happy" – Siegbert Tarrasch
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KaosAquarius 1 month, 3 weeks ago

White to play and deliver checkmate in 3 moves!
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1.Nc7 Kf8 2.Qd8 Bxd8 3.Re8 - Chess player on Oct. 20, 2019, 6:34 p.m.


Well spotted! - KaosAquarius on Oct. 20, 2019, 6:48 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 1 month, 3 weeks ago

"Patience is not passive, on the contrary, it is concentrated strength." – Bruce Lee
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KaosAquarius 1 month, 3 weeks ago

"It is rightly said that the most difficult thing in chess is winning a won position." – Vladimir Kramnik
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KaosAquarius 1 month, 4 weeks ago

"You've got to think about big things while you're doing small things, so that all the small things go in the right direction." – Alvin Toffler
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KaosAquarius 2 months ago

"Attitude is a choice. Happiness is a choice. Optimism is a choice. Kindness is a choice. Giving is a choice. Respect is a choice. Whatever choice you make makes you. Choose wisely." Roy T. Bennett
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KaosAquarius 2 months ago

"If you learn from defeat, you haven’t really lost." Zig Ziglar
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KaosAquarius 2 months ago

##chess## 1. c4 e5 2. d3 Nc6 3. g3 Bc5 4. Nc3 d6 5. Bg2 Nf6 6. Nf3 a6 7. O-O h6 8. a3 O-O 9. b4 Ba7 10. Bb2 Be6 11. Rc1 Qd7 12. e3 Ne7 13. d4 exd4 14. Nxd4 Bxc4 15. Ne4 Nxe4 16. Rxc4 d5 17. Bxe4 Rfd8 18. Bh7+ Kh8 19. Bf5 Nxf5 20. Nxf5 Qxf5 21. Rxc7 d4 22. Bxd4 Bxd4 23. exd4 a5 24. Rxb7 Qd5 25. Re7 axb4 26. axb4 Rab8 27. Qd2 Qc4 28. Rd1 Qxb4 29. Rxf7 Qc4 30. Re7 Rd5 31. Qf4 Rg8 32. h4 Qa4 33. Rd2 Qb4 34. Qe3 Ra5 35. Re8 Ra1+ 36. Kh2 Qb1 37. Rxg8+ Kxg8 38. Qf3 Qg1+ 39. Kh3 Qf1+ 40. Qg2 Qe1 41. Qd5+ Kh7 42. Rb2 Qf1+ 43. Kg4 Ra6 44. h5 1-0 ##pgn## Great game between Vladislav Artemiev and Eduardo Iturrizaga from the current Grand Swiss Tournament being played at Isle of Man, after a purely strategical opening by white, the mid-game gets complicated after a series of piece trades that leave black with a notably passive position, allowing white to gain a modest but decisive material advantage, then black resigned because of white's pawn majority and superior endgame position, with best play from both players Stockfish 10 gives the following variation 44....Qd3; 45.Qf5+ Qxf5+; 46.Kxf5 Kg8; 47.d5 [the passed pawn decides the issue] Kf8; 48.Ke5 Ra1; 49.Rb8+ Ke7; 50.d6+ Kd7; 51.Rb7+ Kc6; 52.Rc7+ Kb6; 53.Rxg7 Re1+; 54.Kf5 Rh1; 55.Ke6 Re1+; 56.Kd7 Re2; 57.f4 Ra2; 58.Rg6 Ra7+; 59.Ke8 Ra8+; 60.Ke7 Rh8; 61.d7+ Kc7; 62.Rxh6 [deviation maneuver] Rxh6; 63.d8=Q+ and white wins, gg!

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PGN viewer didn't load the game, but here's a link to check it out http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1974781 - KaosAquarius on Oct. 11, 2019, 1:58 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 2 months ago

"Above all else, before playing in competitions a player must have regard to his health, for if he is suffering from ill-health he cannot hope for success. In this connection the best of all tonics is 15 to 20 days in the fresh air, in the country." – Mikhail Botvinnik
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 1 week ago

White to play and win! In this position from the game Carlsen - Harestad, Copenhagen 2003
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 1 week ago

"I believe that true beauty of chess is more than enough to satisfy all possible demands" – Alexander Alekhine
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 1 week ago

Self-confidence is very important. If you don’t think you can win, you will take cowardly decisions in the crucial moments, out of sheer respect for your opponent. You see the opportunity but also greater limitations than you should. I have always believed in what I do on the chessboard, even when I had no objective reason to. It is better to overestimate your prospects than underestimate them. – Magnus Carlsen
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 1 week ago

“Whoever sees no other aim in the game than that of giving checkmate to one’s opponent will never become a good Chess player” – Max Euwe
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 1 week ago

“Winning isn’t everything... but losing is nothing” – Edmar Mednis
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 1 week ago

"Pawns: they are the soul of this game, they alone form the attack and defense" – François-André Danican Philidor
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 1 week ago

“Chess is so inspiring that I do not believe a good player is capable of having an evil thought during the game” – Wilhem Steinitz
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 1 week ago

There are no good or bad pieces in the middlegame. Mihai Suba argued with these words, in Dynamic Chess Strategy, that there are only misplaced pieces and they are a temporary problem. If one player can steadily improve the placement of his pieces, while his opponent cannot or can do so only minimally, the first player eventually will get the upper hand even if his position is structurally inferior. This is significant because we often exaggerate the value of pawn structure. Because of structure we used to automatically rate the next position [See diagram, black to play] as winning for white. He has the better pawns, the better pieces and the better of the tactics (1....Qf7; 2.Bxh7+! Kxh7??; 3.Ng5+). But only the pawn structure is lasting. After 1....g6! Black makes his bishop a bit worse but sets in motion a plan to improve almost all his pieces, with ...Qg7, ...Bd7, …Rf7, ...Raf8 and so on. In response, white needs his own plan, such as 2.Na4 and Nc5. In Marjanovic-Timman, Sarajevo 1986 white lost any claim to advantage after 2.Bb1 Qg7; 3.Kh1 Bd7; 4.Re1 Rf7; 5.Ne2 Kh8; 6.a3 Raf8. Black later carried out a remarkable new plan, ...h6, ...Be8-f7-g8 and ...g5!, that helped him win. [The Wisest Things Ever Said About Chess]
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 1 week ago

"Playing chess has many aspects that can be useful in everyday situations like planning, concentration and combinations. You learn to win but also to lose and to be creative." – Judit Polgár
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Can we play a chess match? I want only to practice :) - Chess player on Oct. 2, 2019, 5:50 p.m.


Sure, I'll send you my challenge on lichess - KaosAquarius on Oct. 2, 2019, 8:20 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 2 months, 1 week ago

"For success I consider three factors are necessary: firstly, an awareness of my own strengths and weaknesses; secondly, an accurate understanding of my opponent’s strengths and weaknesses; thirdly, a higher aim than momentary satisfaction. I see this aim as being scientific and artistic achievements, which place the game of chess on a par with other arts." – Alexander Alekhine
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 2 weeks ago

“Strategy requires thought, tactics require observation” – Max Euwe
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I have read Max books. IT was actually one of my first books. Excellent player. - pawnbeat on Sept. 29, 2019, 5:28 a.m.


Nice, I haven't read much of his literary works but I always enjoyed this saying. - KaosAquarius on Oct. 2, 2019, 4:54 a.m.


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KaosAquarius 2 months, 2 weeks ago

What must you specifically do to get good at chess? Study and practice. There is no way around it. You must play a lot of games both against your peers and, preferably, against people somewhat stronger than you. You must also study well-annotated games of the great masters. This way, knowing what correct, creative chess playing looks like becomes a form of pattern recognition that you will eventually apply automatically. Then, if you ever get to the point where you enjoy playing over and trying to understand fine games, I guarantee that your understanding and your playing strength will improve. You should also, especially at the beginning, study tactics, by going through and attempting to solve collections of combinations, because tactics are the basic, unique language of chess. You create winning positions with good strategy, and usually resolve them with good tactics. [Source: F. Wilson - 101 Questions on How to Play Chess]
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pawnbeat 2 months, 3 weeks ago

Hey Kaos I have the Robert L. Grau Tomos Are you familiar with them?

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Indeed, I have them, really awesome treatises on chess full of great didactic examples about all elements of the game, now that you mention these books I might post some abstracts from them here. Regards. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 25, 2019, 4:05 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 2 months, 3 weeks ago

"Winning is not a secret that belongs to a very few, winning is something that we can learn by studying ourselves, studying the environment and making ourselves ready for any challenge that is in front of us." – Garry Kasparov
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Used to be my favorite chess player but now Carlsen is. - pawnbeat on Sept. 24, 2019, 2:58 a.m.


I agree about Carlsen, his style is not my favorite but he's certainly the player of modern times that I respect the most, some people criticize him for being too 'dry' in combinatorial ideas, but his clear endgame technique is just great, and for that he can't be less than any other classic chess player like Kasparov, whose more combinatorial dexterity is also worth of admiration, but overall the legacy of these players, irrespective of styles, is what truly endures for us to learn and improve! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 25, 2019, 4:21 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 2 months, 3 weeks ago

What exactly throws beginners off in the endgame? There are two characteristics of endgames that novices find particularly confusing: First, after all the talk about how important it is to protect your king, by "tucking it safely away in a corner", away from the action in the center, in the endgame the king is a fighting piece! That's right, most successful endgame play requires that you activate your king as soon as most of the major pieces, generally the queens and one pair of rooks, are gone. Generally, you need your king to help attack you opponent's pawns and minor pieces; it is often also needed to help shepherd one of your pawns through to queen. Secondly, after all the harping on how important even a single pawn is, as it is potentially a new quen, it is a bit disconcerting to learn that there are many, many endgames which are theoretical draws despite one side being a pawn ahead! This is why it is essential to study basic endgame theory - so you can learn to win won positions and save difficult ones. [Source: F.Wilson - 101 Questions on How to Play Chess]
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 3 weeks ago

"Making the king secure is at least the equivalent of a strong developing move." Rudolf Spielmann, who knew a thing or two about king safety, was responding thus to the mistaken view that castling wastes a tempo that could be better used in advancing a piece. Quite the contrary: castling is the most efficient of all opening moves because it performs two functions, securing the king and developing the rook. A more valid charge of wastefulness can be made against "castling by hand", which usually means spending two king tempi to safeguard it. But it makes sense when you want the rook to remain where it is. [Source: A. Soltis, The Wisest Things Ever Said About Chess]
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 3 weeks ago

##chess## 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. O-O Be7 5. c4 O-O 6. d4 dxc4 7. Qc2 a6 8. a4 Bd7 9. Qxc4 Bc6 10. Bg5 Nbd7 11. Nc3 h6 12. Bxf6 Nxf6 13. Rfd1 Bd5 14. Qd3 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 c6 16. Kg2 Qa5 17. e3 Rfd8 18. Qc4 Rac8 19. Rab1 Nd5 20.Qb3 Qb4 21. Qc2 a5 22. h4 Nf6 23. h5 Rc7 24. Ne2 Qb6 25. Nf4 Nd5 26. Rbc1 Bd6 27. Nd3 Nb4 28. Qb3 Rcd7 29. Be4 Qc7 30. Rh1 Nxd3 31. Bxd3 Be7 32. Bb1 Qd6 33. Qc2 Bf6 34. Qc5 Qxc5 35. Rxc5 Rd5 36. Rc4 e5 37. Be4 R5d7 38. dxe5 Bxe5 39. b4 axb4 40. Rxb4 Ra8 41. Rhb1 Ra7 42. Bf5 Re7 43. Bc8 c5 44. Rb5 Rc7 45. Bxb7 Rxa4 46. Bd5 Kf8 47. f4 Bc3 48. e4 Bd4 49. e5 c4 50. Rb8+ Ke7 51. R1b7 Ra7 52. Bc6 f5 53. Rxc7+ Rxc7 54. Ba4 Ra7 55. Rb4 Rc7 56. Kf3 Ke6 57. Bc2 Ba7 58. Ra4 Bb6 59. Ke2 Kd5 60. Bxf5 Ra7 61. Rxa7 Bxa7 62. Kf3 Bc5 63. Bh7 c3 64. Kg4 Bf2 65. Bg8+ Kc6 66. Bb3 Kd7 67. Kf3 Be1 68. g4 Bd2 69. Ke4 Ke7 70. Kf5 Be3 71. g5 hxg5 72. Kxg5 Bd2 73. Kg4 Be3 74. Kf3 Bd2 75. h6 gxh6 76. f5 c2 77. f6+ Kf8 78. Bxc2 Bc3 79. Kf4 h5 80. Bd1 h4 81. Bg4 Ba5 82. Kf5 Bc7 83. e6 Bd8 84. Bh5 h3 85. Bg4 h2 86. Bf3 Kg8 87. Kg6 Kf8 88. Bc6 1-0 ##pgn## Game of the day! Grischuk - Dominguez, from the 2019 Chess World Cup, great endgame technique by Grischuk
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 3 weeks ago

Game of the day! Grischuk - Dominguez, from the 2019 Chess World Cup, great endgame technique by Grischuk ##chess## 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. O-O Be7 5. c4 O-O 6. d4 dxc4 7. Qc2 a6 8. a4 Bd7 9. Qxc4 Bc6 10. Bg5 Nbd7 11. Nc3 h6 12. Bxf6 Nxf6 13. Rfd1 Bd5 14. Qd3 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 c6 16. Kg2 Qa5 17. e3 Rfd8 18. Qc4 Rac8 19. Rab1 Nd5 20.Qb3 Qb4 21. Qc2 a5 22. h4 Nf6 23. h5 Rc7 24. Ne2 Qb6 25. Nf4 Nd5 26. Rbc1 Bd6 27. Nd3 Nb4 28. Qb3 Rcd7 29. Be4 Qc7 30. Rh1 Nxd3 31. Bxd3 Be7 32. Bb1 Qd6 33. Qc2 Bf6 34. Qc5 Qxc5 35. Rxc5 Rd5 36. Rc4 e5 37. Be4 R5d7 38. dxe5 Bxe5 39. b4 axb4 40. Rxb4 Ra8 41. Rhb1 Ra7 42. Bf5 Re7 43. Bc8 c5 44. Rb5 Rc7 45. Bxb7 Rxa4 46. Bd5 Kf8 47. f4 Bc3 48. e4 Bd4 49. e5 c4 50. Rb8+ Ke7 51. R1b7 Ra7 52. Bc6 f5 53. Rxc7+ Rxc7 54. Ba4 Ra7 55. Rb4 Rc7 56. Kf3 Ke6 57. Bc2 Ba7 58. Ra4 Bb6 59. Ke2 Kd5 60. Bxf5 Ra7 61. Rxa7 Bxa7 62. Kf3 Bc5 63. Bh7 c3 64. Kg4 Bf2 65. Bg8+ Kc6 66. Bb3 Kd7 67. Kf3 Be1 68. g4 Bd2 69. Ke4 Ke7 70. Kf5 Be3 71. g5 hxg5 72. Kxg5 Bd2 73. Kg4 Be3 74. Kf3 Bd2 75. h6 gxh6 76. f5 c2 77. f6+ Kf8 78. Bxc2 Bc3 79. Kf4 h5 80. Bd1 h4 81. Bg4 Ba5 82. Kf5 Bc7 83. e6 Bd8 84. Bh5 h3 85. Bg4 h2 86. Bf3 Kg8 87. Kg6 Kf8 88. Bc6 1-0 ##pgn##
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 3 weeks ago

Thank you guys for joining the community, I hope you enjoy your stay in Cardigan Chess!
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pawnbeat 2 months, 3 weeks ago

I enjoy this community a lot.

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I'm glad to hear that, thanks a lot for your support! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 21, 2019, 4:27 a.m.


Buiboy became a villager and now supports Cardigan Chess: Quotes & Life's Community

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KaosAquarius 2 months, 3 weeks ago

White to play and win!
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Solution: This position is all about latent power of the pieces through other pieces, but also an illustration of how important is to manage tempo in a decisive position, as can be noticed there's three white pieces aiming at h7-square, the d3-bishop, h2-rook and h6-queen, however the only piece with an immediate action on h7-square is the queen, but to add attacking pressure on such square with something like Ng5?? 'threatening checkmate' or Nxf7+ just wouldn't work because the queen is attacked and black can simply reply ...Bxh6 winning the queen and also pinning the knight thus stopping any fork idea by white and winning the initiative; retreating the queen is considerable, as the position would still be favorable for white although it would be a missed chance because the optimal activity of white asks for a sharp tactical finesse as 1.Qxh7+!!, a decisive sacrifice, and black might as well resign already because after ...Kxh7 the neat finishing move is the pretty looking 2.hxg6!# that unleashes the active potential of the other pieces focused on the h7-square, the pawn supported by the e3-bishop in combination with the h2-rook are give double check along the diagonal and file, as the king is enclosed by this simultaneous attack the game ends in checkmate! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 21, 2019, 5:39 p.m.


d3-bishop* are giving* Sorry for typos. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 21, 2019, 5:43 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 2 months, 3 weeks ago

"It is dangerous to maintain equality at the cost of placing the pieces passively." – Anatoly Karpov
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 3 weeks ago

Black to play and win! [Puzzle #4407 from Lázló Polgár's 5334 Problems, Combinations & Games]
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Chess player 2 months, 3 weeks ago

##chess## 1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 d6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. d3 g6 5. g3 Bg7 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O Nc6 8. h3 Be6 9. a3 Qd7 10. Ng5 Nd4 11. Nxe6 Qxe6 12. Ne2 Nc6 13. Nf4 Qd7 14. c3 a6 15. Bd2 b5 16. b4 Ne5 17. Qc2 Rac8 18. Ne2 Qe6 19. f4 Nc6 20. f5 Qe5 21. Bf4 cxb4 22. Bxe5 Nxe5 23. axb4 Nfd7 24. d4 Nc4 25. Rf3 Rc6 26. d5 Rc7 27. Nd4 Nde5 28. Raf1 Nxf3+ 29. Rxf3 Ne5 30. Rf1 Nc4 31. Rf3 Na3 32. Qa2 Nc4 33. Qxa6 Rfc8 34. Qxb5 Ne5 35. Nc6 Nxc6 36. dxc6 Rxc6 37. Qd5 Bxc3 38. fxg6 hxg6 39. Qxf7+ Kh8 40. Qxe7 Be5 41. Rf7 Rc1+ 42. Kh2 Kg8 43. Rh7 R1c3 44. Qf7# ##pgn## Game vs Thibault

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well played! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 19, 2019, 3:40 p.m.


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Chess player 2 months, 3 weeks ago

KaosAquarius, do you have Lichess club?

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Well, this community is sort of a club, but not in Lichess, I don't like the lichess team-platform in fact, it's not very interactive, that's why I liked better to make this community instead where anyone can have more interactivity along the moderation code. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 18, 2019, 9:02 a.m.


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pawnbeat 2 months, 4 weeks ago

Have you ever read the book the 49 of Power by Robert Green? I recommend it if you haven't.

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No, I'll check it out, surely some philosophy never comes bad, thanks for the recommendation. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 16, 2019, 8:26 a.m.


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KaosAquarius 2 months, 4 weeks ago

"To know ten thousand things, know one well" - Musashi Miyamoto
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KaosAquarius 2 months, 4 weeks ago

Exact calculation is, generally speaking, needed more in defensive positions than in attack. This counter-intuitive truth comes from Rudolf Spielmann in The Art of Sacrifice in Chess. A modern version, from Vladimir Kramnik on e3e5.com, is that calculation is "far more important in defense than in attack." He added: "In order to succeed in defense one must be a brilliant tactician and see all the possibilities and all the tactical points of the opponent. I'd even suggest such a 'seditious' idea that the attack is a more positional technique than the defense. The attack can be based on general considerations while the defense must be specific." (A. Soltis - The Wisest Things Ever Said About Chess)
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KaosAquarius 3 months ago

Black to play and execute the ancient arabian mate, the oldest checkmate, in 4 moves! More info about this pattern here: https://www.chesskid.com/article/view/the-oldest-checkmate-ever-the-arabian-mate
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The solution is: 1....Rf2+ clearing f3 for the knight and pressing the white king to retreat, of course white doesn't block with Rg2 because that would just lose the rook and the game sooner than soon; 2.Kh1 now the king is totally restricted, but to give the checkmate the knight must be brought into the action! so black plays the brilliant ...Rh2+!!, sacrificing the rook and leaving white with no other choice than 3.Kxh2 so black can now play ...Nf3+! as it is check with a knight, it can't be blocked, so either the knight must be captured or the king has to move, in this case the only move available is 4.Kh1 as the rook on g8 blocks any the escape squares of the white king through g3 or g2, and now as both pieces, the f3-knight and g8-rook are focusing their force at g1 the grand finale of the combination is ...Rxg1#, delivering this fantastic arabian checkmate, gg! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 14, 2019, 10:43 p.m.


I never heard of this mate. Where doe sit come from? - pawnbeat on Sept. 15, 2019, 8:22 p.m.


This checkmate sequence comes from the spiritual ancestor of chess in its early setup known as shatranj, and its most powerful pieces were the knight and the rook, so the most usual way to give checkmate was through the maneuvering of these pieces, here's some more info about it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shatranj https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Checkmate_pattern#Arabian_mate - KaosAquarius on Sept. 16, 2019, 12:26 a.m.


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KaosAquarius 3 months ago

White to play and deliver checkmate! From the game Alekhine - Freeman, New York 1924
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Solution: In this position the tactical themes of the pin and the deviation outstand for their dynamic force on the opponent's camp, since the black knight is pinned by the e8-rook thus restricting its mobility, the coordination of white pieces, knight and queen are threatening checkmate on g7 so the knight can't get to g6 to block the threat due to the pin, and the black queen must keep guarding g7, however white's queen is just undefended as it stands on g5, urging white to play actively as the position demands so as to not lose the advantage, therefore what Alekhine played here is 1.Nh6+!! pressing black to either capture the knight [Not with the pawn of course, because of the pin once again, but with the queen instead], or move his king to the only available square h8, which he doesn't because then the f8-knight would be left unprotected and white would simply capture it with checkmate, so the true idea of this maneuver unfolds after black captures the knight with ...Qxh6; and now it is noticeable how the black queen that was defending the h4-d8 diagonal has been deviated from its labor allowing white to conclude the game flawlessly with 2.Rxf8+ sacrificing his rook and also attracting the king to his finale after ...Kxf7 only move, as the rook controlled the entire 8th rank and 3.Qd8# dispensing with all available material force to achieve a stunning climax in great tactical style, gg!!! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 14, 2019, 11:23 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 3 months ago

"The player with advantage must attack" - Wilhem Steinitz was famous for making rules. Some became the foundation of how the game is played. Others couldn't even be followed successfully by Steinitz himself. One of his most famous rules -which is known as Steinitz's Law- is based on the premise that sound attacks stem from positional advantages. Your attack cannot succeed if you don't have an edge to justify it, he said. This was brilliant and original. It replaced the older view that attacks succeeded or failed because of the attacker's genius or lack of it. Steinitz could have stopped there. But he added a guide to action: The player who obtains that edge not only has the right but the obligation to attack. If he doesn't, his advantage is bound to evaporate. [Source: A. Soltis, The Wisest Things Ever Said About Chess]
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Yes, Steinitz love making rules. Now some GMs like making rules too. But I don't think "The player with advantage must attack" it right. You can make your advantage larger in two ways: 1. Attacking 2.Position play style, where you make your pieses' place better and better every move! - Chess player on Sept. 15, 2019, 10 a.m.


Your idea is understandable, but I think also that it is not just simply a generic rule in pursuit of an invisible initiative, but a natural law of the game, that's why it strictly says that only the player with the advantage can attack, which implies that attack can only be possible with a positional justification to unfold the active potential of a player's coordinated pieces, it doesn't mean 'to get advantage you must attack', however I agree that improving the pieces activity is a valid approach to acquire an advantage, but what is to be done when a player's pieces are already better than his opponent's pieces? keep improving them? It would be uninspiring, if not mediocre to say the least, to expect mistakes from the opponent to get an advantage while just optimizing pieces, so the quest for initiative with better pieces must be carried out through the principle of attack, as Lasker once stated 'position play complements combination [attacking] play', which is a preface to Steinitz's idea, but in general I think your criterion is alright in reference to positional style. Regards. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 15, 2019, 11:35 a.m.


Yes, I am love positional playing more than attacking. Attacking includes sacfrices, and some of them can be incorrect. - Chess player on Sept. 17, 2019, 6:19 p.m.


True, but however chess is played it's about the fun after all - KaosAquarius on Sept. 18, 2019, 8:47 a.m.


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KaosAquarius 3 months ago

White to play and win! From this position of the game Akobian - Lugo, Minneapolis 2005
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Beautiful combination. Rf7+, Qxf7, Rh4, Kg8, Rh8# Checkmate. - pawnbeat on Sept. 12, 2019, 12:16 p.m.


Indeed, Rf7+ is a really nice maneuver to deviate the queen from the protection of the h4-square while blocking the only escape square for the black king, gg! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 12, 2019, 7:40 p.m.


I enjoy this puzzles. Maybe we can add puzzles to our communities? Like a feature for chess related communities? - pawnbeat on Sept. 13, 2019, 2:42 a.m.


Good idea, looking forward to it! - KaosAquarius on Sept. 13, 2019, 6:44 a.m.


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pawnbeat 3 months ago

Analyse the position. Black to move. Choose best move: 1. Qc7 2. Qd6 3. Bg7 4. NxR
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Interesting and difficult position. This happened at the World Cup 2019! - pawnbeat on Sept. 11, 2019, 10:24 p.m.


Very difficult position, by elimination the 3rd and 4th options are discarded, ...Nxe1 leads to checkmate by white after giving up the rook on b5 and then the queen on d7; ...Bg7 doesn't lead to checkmate but allows the white pieces to activate first with a check from the queen on a4, then Re3 attacking the knight and so on; then the only considerable options would be ...Qc7 or ...Qd6, both which threaten an immediate checkmate on h2 while clearing the d8 square for the king after white checks him from a4, although ...Qc7 looks a bit odd to me because the queen is undefended on that square while on d6 it is defended by the e7-pawn, but ...Qd6 lets the white pieces activate after the exchange of queens with Qxd6 exd6, Re3 attacking the knight and the black pieces start retreating, so I would choose ...Qc7 which although looks a bit odd, holds the checkmate threat and clears a square for the king on e8, but still the position looks very double edged and with inaccurate play by any of the players it could lead to a win for any of them, so ...Qc7 seems the most balanced move - KaosAquarius on Sept. 11, 2019, 10:38 p.m.


From what game of the world cup is it? I'd like to check it out - KaosAquarius on Sept. 11, 2019, 10:41 p.m.


I just saw it's from the Svidler - Albornoz game, and actually ...Qc7 wins for white! :0 Well, the black position was already very passive and really difficult to defend, and didn't even consider ...Bg7 since I played against the engine and was outplayed pretty quickly haha but ...Bg7 is better in fact, difficult exercise though, but I think black didn't play good enough until this position. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 13, 2019, 12:53 a.m.


How did you find this game? - pawnbeat on Sept. 13, 2019, 9:56 p.m.


Watching agadmator's YouTube channel, he recently posted an analysis of it. - KaosAquarius on Sept. 13, 2019, 10:04 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 3 months ago

"If the student forces himself to examine all moves that smite, however absurd they may look at first glance, he is on the way to becoming a master of tactics." - Cecil Purdy
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KaosAquarius 3 months ago

White to play! Checkmate in 3 moves, from the game Addicks - Gudjev, Prague 1931
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Bxf7, Kxf7, Ng5+,Kg8 or Kf6 ,Qd6# Checkmate! - pawnbeat on Sept. 10, 2019, 12:39 p.m.


gg! Look forward to more tactical exercises - KaosAquarius on Sept. 10, 2019, 10:49 p.m.


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KaosAquarius 3 months ago

"When my opponent's clock is going I discuss general considerations in an internal dialogue with myself. When my own clock is going I analyse concrete variations." - Mikhail Botvinnik
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I enjoy this quote very much. - pawnbeat on Sept. 17, 2019, 6:17 p.m.


Reallly wise person... And a great player! - Chess player on Sept. 17, 2019, 6:25 p.m.


Indeed, Botvinnik was a great supporter of chess and its games are an enduring legacy quality of strategical play, also his quotes are really instructive - KaosAquarius on Sept. 19, 2019, 2:49 p.m.


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